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Welcome to Pityriasis Rosea Pictures Dot Net

If you’ve found this site…you likely have had the misfortune of  contracting our lovely, skin rash, friend that is Pityriasis Rosea.  You probably have several questions and are looking for some answers.  This site should give you a bit of information on Pityriasis Rosea and how to alleviate its symptoms…read on!

You may be asking yourself…

“What is Pityriasis Rosea?”
We have an entire page above detailing this mysterious skin condition…just click the link.

“Do I have Pityriasis Rosea?”
Your best bet, of course, is to consult a dermatologist and get properly diagnosed.  Pityriasis Rosea has some pretty recognizable characteristics though, so you should be able to spot it when you see it.  Most mistake the originating “Herald Patch” as ringworm…only to be covered in ring-like patches all over within a week or two.
Take a browse through our “Pityriasis Rosea Pictures” gallery by clicking the link above.  If your rash resembles those examples…chances are you’re also a victim.  However, not to alarm you…but, second stage Syphilis looks similar, so it is always a good idea to get it checked out by a doctor and get some testing done if Syphilis is a possibility (only you can answer that question).  PR will go away eventually on its own…but, Syphilis is something you DO NOT want to ignore. I recommend STD Express for fast STD testing with a 1-3 day turnaround. CLICK HERE for $25 off your choice of panel tests.

“How did I get Pityriasis Rosea?”
This truly is the million dollar question.  Doctors really don’t know how it is contracted or where it comes from.  Some doctors believe it is introduced to the body by a viral/bacterial infection and is somehow linked to human herpesvirus 7 (HHV7 was found in all cases during clinical studies of PR…don’t worry, over 95% of people have been infected and are immune to HHV-7)…but, the verdict is still out.  About 70% of people have upper respiratory infections (sore throat) a week or two prior to getting Pityriasis Rosea.

“Is Pityriasis Rosea contagious?”
It is not contagious, though there have been reports of small epidemics in fraternity houses, military bases, schools and gyms. I had Pityriasis Rosea for over 6 months and was with my girlfriend the entire time. We were intimate the whole time during my stint with this funky rash and she never got so much as a red splotch. I know I looked like I had the plague, so it took some convincing, but she was a trooper and never showed any signs or symptoms of PR. It’s viral and internal, so cannot be spread from just skin contact. Although, the close quarter “epidemics” mentioned above do raise questions.

“How do I get rid of Pityriasis Rosea?”
Another million dollar question.  Check out the information at the “Cure for Pityriasis Rosea” link above.

“Am I alone with this funky rash?”
Absolutely not! The overall prevalence of pityriasis rosea in the United States has been estimated to be 0.13% in men and 0.14% in women.  It most commonly occurs between the ages of 10 and 35.  Feel free to visit the “Support Group” tab above to connect with others that are dealing with outbreaks or have in the past.  Also, scroll down for personal stories from others that are dealing with PR.  Awareness is key and connecting with others who are dealing with this horrible rash helps immensely.  You can learn how others cope with PR and find out how they alleviate symptoms.

If you don’t mind sharing your PR story and pictures, I’d love to add it to the site in order to help others dealing with this monster.  Please send me your story and I’ll add it to the site below.  Don’t worry…you will remain anonymous: contact@pityriasis-rosea.net

The bottom line is…

PR is not contagious.
PR can reoccur…but, only for about 2% of people.
PR will not kill or hurt you.  It will embarrass you, however.
PR will go away on its own…eventually.  Most cases clear up in a few weeks.

My stint of Pityriasis Rosea lasted 6 months, unfortunately.  There are ways to speed up the recovery process.
Click the “PR Treatment & Remedies” link at the top of the page for your best course of action to kick this awful rash as quickly as possible. Hang in there…it’ll be over before you know it.

A “Cure for Pityriasis Rosea” ???

EPX Body Immune

Since PR is likely a viral infection, this could be exactly what sufferers are looking for. I’d love to get some feedback from anyone willing to give this a shot at knocking out their Pityriasis Rosea. So far, I only have one account of a lady who got rid of her Pityriasis Rosea in just two weeks after taking this. It could be subjective, but I’d like to hear from others. Give it a shot! A quick video below about EPX Body Immune


“Undateables” is looking for Pityriasis Rosea sufferers in the UK!

I’m writing regarding the new series of Undateables we’re producing here at ‘betty’ for Channel 4 in the UK. We are only looking for people who are based anywhere in the UK.

Just to let you know a little more about the show, in case you haven’t seen it; once again we are making a vibrant, romantic and insightful documentary series which will follow disabled people and those with a variety of conditions on their quest to find love. The series will also aim to explore society’s attitude towards disabled people and how this can affect relationships.

The series will follow key mile-stones in our contributors’ journeys and explore their thoughts and feelings about their experiences along the way.  From meeting the agency and getting their dating profile set up to preparing for their first date, we will document the highs and lows of their journey.

We’re currently in the process of talking to a number of organisations, including leading disability networks and charities about the series idea, to ensure the issues are handled sensitively.  Alison Walsh, Channel 4’s Disability Adviser is also working with us on the project.

There is a link to the show here: http://www.channel4.com/programmes/the-undateables/4od.

We’re really excited about Undateables returning and feel it is a great opportunity to continue to create a greater understanding about the issues and prejudices that are faced especially with a condition like Pityriasis that is so rare. I hope the above information gives more of an insight into our aims for the series.

Please feel free to call me on 0207 290 0669 or 07810332426 with any questions at all.

Alternatively you can email us on undateables@betty.co.uk

Best wishes,

Lizzie Hardy | Assistant Producer

Pityriasis Rosea Survey

I’m trying to find some commonalities among Pityriasis Rosea sufferers. If you’d like to take this quick little survey to help us all…please click the red link below:

Pityriasis Rosea Survey

Top 10 Questions about Pityriasis Rosea

I get a lot of questions through the site about Pityriasis Rosea so I thought I’d create a quick video of the most common questions people ask. Here are the top ten questions I receive about Pityriasis Rosea…hope it answers some of your questions.

Pityriasis Rosea Misdiagnosed twice by Doctors

“I got married 7 weeks ago and on my wedding day had what I now know is the herald patch on my thigh. (luckily not visible in my wedding dress!)

I went off on honeymoon to sunny Thailand and whilst out there I self diagnosed ringworm. I bought fungiderm cream over the counter which has a strong steroid and anti fungal. The steroid and the sun cleared up my herald patch until it was barely visible. Obviously as it had responded to a fungal cream I thought it must have been fungal!

Towards the end of my 2 week break a couple of spots started appearing under my arms and on my butt (sorry for the detail!) Again I thought this must be fungal as it was in sweaty places and I was in a hot environment. Looking back it was in places that weren’t seeing the sunlight which I think was delaying the outbreak on the rest of my body.

So when I get home to the UK, I feel awful, headache and fever. I go to doctor about this And the “ringworm”. At this point I would have hoped the doctor could have seen my herald patch and linked it with fever and diagnosed me with PR. But no! like most other patients I was told it was definitely ringworm, given cream and given antibiotics for my “sinus infection”.

over the next couple of weeks the rash really came out over my entire torso, and thighs and upper arms. I returned to the doctor and saw a different GP to the first who asked me to show him the largest area. I kept trying to say it was everywhere but he didn’t even ask me to undress. If he had he might have noticed the Christmas tree pattern of the rash, or maybe not. For such a common complaint and with such obvious symptoms it’s surprising GPs don’t recognise it. I really wish he had! Because he was still sure it was ringworm and when I asked if he was sure it couldn’t be anything else he said no definitely fungal :( so I was given horribly strong anti fungal tablets. I had an upset stomach and felt awful.

I took these horrible tablets for 9 days and the rash didn’t clear up at all (obviously!). Then it suddenly spread massively (2 weeks after first massive outbreak). It was now on my collar bone, shoulders and neck.

I didn’t understand how fungal infection could spread so fast. I was stressing out changing bedding and towels everyday whilst working long hours in a stressful job. Commuting in sweaty London during Olympics and constantly fearing I could pass this horrible fungus to my brand new husband and everyone I’d ever come in contact with! If it was spreading this fast on me how could I not be infecting my other half sleeping in the same bed?!

Im not sure if it was the stress, the heat or the strong antifungal tablets that brought on this Second wave of rash but it forced me back to the doctor.

So the 3rd GP I saw this week (7 weeks into the rash!) finally diagnosed me with PR. she said it straight after seeing me and I felt instantly relieved I wasn’t being eaten alive by fungus! I then went to the pharmacy to pick up the steroid cream I had been prescribed. As it had taken so long to be diagnosed I still wasn’t certain so showed it to the pharmacist who diagnosed PR and had said she’d had it herself.

Phew! Diagnoses confirmed and I can go about dealing with it.


I have a couple of questions. When the first round of rash came out I had a fever but felt better after wards (even though at this point the rash looked horrendous). Then with this second onslaught I’ve felt terrible fatigue and fever again. I’ve had to take a couple of days off work and obviously now I know what the rash is I can tell my employers. But if they are to google it pr is described as mild and mentions initial low grade fever but potentially not 7 weeks in? Not sure if it’s the stress of it all and the actual appearance and itchy sleepless nights that are making me feel so low or If it’s this virus causing the fatigue???

I’m getting fed up with the whole thing and looking forward to kicking it once and for all.”

-Pityriasis Rosea Honeymooner – United Kingdom

Common Misdiagnosis of Pityriasis Rosea

Pityriasis Rosea is often misdiagnosed

Pityriasis Rosea can often look similar to other, more serious conditions and is often misdiagnosed. It important to get properly diagnosed by a dermatologist. The first herald patch of pityriasis rosea may look very similar in appearance to ringworm (tinea corporis). Pityriasis has also been mistaken with eczema and psoriasis, which can occur as similar scaly patches, but not in the same distribution as pityriasis rosea.

Pityriasis rosea may be misdiagnosed as:

Psoriasis,
Eczema,
Fungal Infection (tinea corporis),
Secondary Syphilis,
Drug Eruption (a diffuse body rash caused commonly by a reaction to a medications like an oral antibiotic),
Fixed Drug Eruption (a single small, circular or oval patch of skin rash caused by taking a medication),
Eityriasis Lichenoides Chronica,
Parapsoriasis,
HIV-Associated Rash,
Folliculitis

Some of these are not serious conditions, but others are, obviously. If you are concerned that one of the more serious STD’s listed above is a possibility, you need to rule those out immediately as they are much more threatening to your health than just an ugly rash. Go to your local testing lab and schedule an appointment. I recommend STD Express for fast STD testing with a 1-3 day turnaround. CLICK HERE for $25 off your choice of panel tests.

2nd Pityriasis Rosea Outbreak in 2 years.

I first got PR in April 2010. I had just started up my own business in January of 2010, so was very stressed juggling a new business/career and a then 1.5 yr old son. It was not all over my body, mainly torso and thighs. I thought it was bad, that was until end of August 2011 when I got it really bad!

The first bout took 4 months to completely clear. But left me with no scars. It was slightly itchy, but bearable as they were more sporadic and not clustered.  Doctors did not help at all.

The it came back end of August, initially I thought it was just an outbreak of acne due to working long hard hours (3 months without a break) but the bumps all over my back spread to the back of my thighs and then all over the front.

I am 8 weeks in with this bout of PR, it covers me from scalp to toe and boy does it itch!!!!

I can’t do my Bikram Yoga which I am a big fan of, as the heat just makes me itch! Any exercise or sweating is just a no-no!

Was I stressed before this came on? YES!

I also had tonsillitis, which coincidently I had before the first bout too!

Things I have discovered: This will take hold of you the more run down you are!

The cooler you stay the better.  I am a huge sea swimmer, so regularly swim. Even now (October – UK) I am still sea swimming in a costume, as it lowers my blood temperature and then for at least 2 hours after I get out I remain completely itch free BLISS

No creams etc seem to make any difference.  I have seen a Holistic practitioner who has given me drops to stay calm and also , high potency Vit B12 and Serrapeptase + MSM + trace minerals.

However yesterday after much more soul searching on the internet I went for a 3min sun bed and this morning I think it looked a little better. So today I have had 3 more minutes, and if tomorrow it looks better I will try again!

I am a regular healthy 38year old lady, who has a very busy life. I have a very healthy diet, I live in a really beautiful place, I have a gorgeous son and husband. Life is good, but having PR makes me depressed and miserable. But I believe in positive thinking and the more positive I stay, the more I believe this will pass….. PLUS it’s a sign to try and slow the pace of my hectic life.

I love your website, the links help. Photos are a must. I was desperate to see what others looked like, as I have never actually met anyone else who has suffered. It is such an underrated disease and yet so many seem to suffer. Thanks for your site.
-Two time PR Sufferer- United Kingdom